A REVIEW OF HYMAR DAVID’S ‘I FOR DON BLOW BUT I TOO DEY PRESS PHONE’ By Aladodo Abdus-Salam

A REVIEW OF HYMAR DAVID’S ‘I FOR DON BLOW BUT I TOO DEY PRESS PHONE’  By Aladodo Abdus-Salam

A REVIEW OF HYMAR DAVID’S ‘I FOR DON BLOW BUT I TOO DEY PRESS PHONE’

— Aladodo Abdus-Salam

“Most times, we are blowing in bits and pieces of committed hustle: one small gbosa here, one small kpakam there, but, las Las, we are blowing. Small small. Day by day. Blood. Sweat. Determination.” — Hymar David.

Hymar David’s Memoir is ruggedness, plainness, sufferness, friendliness, despair, hope, pains, humour, and reality mixed together to make a gigantic tragi-comic cake. The very first page attests to the fact that the best way to earn and flex in peace is through one’s legit sweat. The dedication is that of love, affection and gratitude. The two-paged introduction are but a precise summary of what the Memoir is all about, of what the life of any Nigerian you see walking on the street is about. Blood. Sweat. Determination.

The first setting of the book took us down memory lane; Author’s childhood days, how academically serious, yet, stubborn he was. I mean, person sabi the sweetness of book, person dey top class, person dey scale fence go steal books to read. He gave us a wonderful insight into his comical, aggressive, rugged, lovely, supportive and strict family: Papa, the typical Nigerian parent who shouts and accompanies it with koboko, an authoritarian. Ìyá Martha, also a typical Nigerian mother, strong-willed, tough, takes no nonsense and considers anything she does not understand as spiritual. Ifeanyi; the eldest child, a terror, rebel, and a bottle breaker. Martha (The eldest Sister); strong and terrific as well. Joshua (took three years from David), a goal-getter, a fighter. Na everything be war to this one. Daniel dey too, na him be David’s beloved sibling and partner in crime. This one no get skushi for head, na only play dey do am. Ama; the one who fights dirty and tries to knee those who fight her in the groin. Maureen, the last born. She sabi chop book Wella.

If you think say na everything wey dey the book I go review, dem don deceive you be that. Ok. So, the author’s descriptions stick, the narrative technique is close to flawless and relatable. The fact that the book is a perfect mixture of English, pidgin and Yoruba kon make sense die. die. As you dey read, you dey learn, you dey laugh. Hymar’s sense of humour is top-notch. Honestly. He narrated his school days in a wonderful way, narrated how he focused on being a disgrace to the family brilliantly. It’s sad, yet beautiful to know that the Author painted his ordeals, his pains and struggles in a humorous way, so much that you might not feel he had a tough time (if you no get sense). Yet, it’s quite a relief that he is channelling his struggles and ordeals towards productivity & enjoying the life of his head. Man no fit kill himself na.

Also, he gave us an insight into what the social space is like for those who are willing to have a bloodbath and have their emotions toyed with. With Facebook being a case study, the author narrated to us how it was for him a medium of expression and the several backlashes. Nigerians are always angry sha, so, no take am to heart if people dey follow you talk nonsense on top your own post. He as well painted a relatable scenario of how Nigeria gets the hold of us all whilst citing the tale of Argentina. In his words: “Nigeria happens to the best of us and we become the last things we dreamed of when we were Young and full of Hope and dreams. When Nigeria happens to you, it keeps happening”.

Anyways, just get the book and read. Hymar Sabi throw punchlines o. Person wey write love letter as a Deeper life member, give Babe letter for church with the opener: “I came to church to worship God and I end up worshipping you”. You fit beat that? Alaye jor jor o. Anyways, here is a take away (you can call it a conclusion): Hymar is basically telling us to be ourselves cos it takes no effort to be wo we are. To be ourselves cos everybody else is already chosen. To be ourselves and never be ashamed of who we are cos when things are tough and the road seems rough, you’ll only see yourself and no one else (I’m not one of the aspire to inspire and backfire folks, I’m only trying to sound poetic). So, why care so much about people judging you for who you are? Just be you and stick to being good. I’m out!

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Author: TaekPoet

Mahmud Sufiyan also known as TaekPoet in the literary world. He is a writer of short stories, a poet and Taekwondist.

1 thought on “A REVIEW OF HYMAR DAVID’S ‘I FOR DON BLOW BUT I TOO DEY PRESS PHONE’ By Aladodo Abdus-Salam

  1. Thanks for this review. I no sey you no give complete review but this one don do. Finally, I have a pick-insight of this book. Thanks.

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